Advanced Aerials removes the mystery from Unmanned Vehicle System development with an assist from Quickparts

In an industry typically shut off by red “Top Secret” stamps and closed-door meetings, Advanced Aerials is doing things a little differently. They’ve put a welcome mat on their door in an effort to not only supply Unmanned Vehicle Systems (UVS) but to perfect their designs and innovate through open-source collaboration. Think of Advanced Aerials’ work as the launching point for creating affordable UVS designs that fulfill the exact requirements of users from military intelligence units to first responders

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Historic Windmills Recreated Using 3D Printing

The American Wind Power Center (AWPC) has partnered with WhiteClouds to create scale models of historic windmills using computer aided design and 3D printing. The windmills will be part of a model train display that will be on show in the AWPC Museum. “We plan to build a model train layout of early Lubbock from 1910 to 1950, a time when there were a large number of windmills in this area,” said Coy Harris, Executive Director of the AWPC. “That is also the time when the train came to Lubbock.”

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Release Date: 
Thursday, August 21, 2014 - 11:00

 

Olaf Diegel is a professor of mechatronics at Massey University of Auckland, a music lover, and a 3D printing enthusiast. In the ultimate merger of passions, Olaf has spent the past several years creating a 3D printed drum kit and several 3D printed guitars using our SLS technology. Most recently, Olaf has risen to the challenge of 3DS CEO Avi Reichental by creating a working alto saxophone, which distinguishes itself from Olaf’s previous creations through the intricacy of its function

Olaf spent weeks examining and measuring the parts of his traditional saxophone as he designed his 3D model. Once completed on screen, it was time to put his design to the test. The saxophone was printed in nylon powder on our sPro 230 3D printer. And? It works!

Satisfied with his proof of concept and achievement in creating the world’s first 3D printed saxophone, Olaf plans to produce a second design that taps deeper into the capabilities of 3D printing. The next iteration will move away from assembled internals and instead integrate springs as part of the instrument keys. And now that the mechanics are all worked out, Olaf intends to have a little more fun with the aesthetics.

To hear what a 3D printed saxophone sounds like, check out the video below, and click here to find out more about Olaf’s plans for future versions.

 

Clarence and Carl Aguirre celebrate two birthdays: April 21st, commemorating the day the conjoined twins were born, and August 4th, commemorating the day they were surgically separated and began to develop separate lives. The 2004 surgery, which this year celebrates its 10 year anniversary, was the final of four staged operations that were undertaken to divide the boys, who were attached at the top of the head. 

The surgery was one of the first successful operations of its kind, and was especially challenging as the boys were not just attached at the skull, but shared a brain connection. This translated to a delicate surgical navigation of all their complex shared vascularity. The odds of the surgery’s success were daunting, but there was no true alternative, as without the operation doctors believed the boys would have perished within 6-8 months.  

Aware of the risks and eager to avoid them, the surgical teams at The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in New York conducted significant research to prepare for the surgery, including the creation of 3D printed models using CT and MRI data. Lead pediatric neurosurgeon Dr. James T. Goodrich says the models were extremely helpful in planning and gave him critical advance insight into potential anatomical complications. The life-size models were printed in 3DS’ ClearView® material, demonstrating the children’s bone structure with selectively colored representations of the critical blood vessels.

“The medical team had to carefully plan out how to gradually separate the vital blood vessels in the brain that were used by both twins,” said Andy Christensen, Vice President of Personalized Surgery and Medical Devices, 3DS. “The surgeons reported that the 3D printed anatomical models were a key part of the surgical planning for this incredibly complex case.” The use of virtual surgical planning is increasing and is changing the way surgeries are performed for dramatically improved results and recovery times. More than a thousand 3DS advanced manufacturing-grade SLA 3D printers are in use in the medical field, producing tens of millions of medical devices annually.

Now, 10 years after surgery, Clarence and Carl are happy 12-year-old boys with distinct personalities. While Carl loves playing video games and spending time with his brother, Clarence is enthusiastically exploring dancing and likes to swim. For their mother Arlene, the past 12 years have been full of challenges and blessings, and she says it is heartwarming to watch her sons interact. “Their bonding is very close. Sometimes we’ll be sitting at the dinner table together and they’ll just look at each other and start to laugh. They still have a very strong connection.”

For more on the twin’s story, watch the video below.

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Friday, August 1, 2014 - 14:00

What if technology could forever alleviate your fears of a lost bag at the airport? Not via chips or tracking, but by transporting your belongings to your final destination so they’re ready and waiting when you get there? Not just any items, either: items that are personalized and made to fit your form, taste and personality. With 3D printing, this space-age hypothetical isn't so far off.

3DS’ own Janne Kyttanen is putting luggage into bits and bytes instead of overhead bins with his complete 3D-printed outfit, comprised of clothing, shoes, accessories and even a bag. The chic outfit, which was displayed at the Lost Luggage exhibit in Rotterdam’s Galerie VIVID, has the potential to render those annoying baggage fees obsolete. Simply select a file, print and go.

Likewise, travelers who have forgotten important custom medical devices, or even been injured while traveling, could easily print their own orthopedics, braces or splints. It’s certainly a better alternative to toughing it out or waiting for it to arrive via snail mail.

3D printing is already shaping how we travel, as many of today’s aircraft and automotive manufacturers use this technology to prototype and print working transportation components. With 3D printed wearables, it won’t be much longer until 3D printing starts to impact what travels with us too.

Click here to read more about how 3D printing will change travel.

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Release Date: 
Thursday, July 31, 2014 - 11:30
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Forging Ahead with the ProX 300 Direct Metal 3D Printer

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Tuesday, July 22, 2014 - 13:45
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A Leg that Fits: Making Natasha's 3D-Printed Prosthetic in Two Weeks

Metal Technology (MTI) forges new path with metal 3D printing and English Racing

3d printer metal oil pump gear proX 300Albany, Oregon, has been a hotbed of metallurgical distinction since 1943 when President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced that the U.S. Bureau of Mines had selected the site to begin researching methods to create zirconium and titanium alloys. That decision provided the impetus for a thriving industry built on developing alloy systems designed to meet extreme applications.

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